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National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC)

ORGANIZATIONS

Note: The material presented in this section was retrieved from various professional websites. We rely upon the validity of the information as presented by these organizations and we anticipate that the information provided is accurate and current. The reader is encouraged to seek more detailed information from the original source.

Links to Web sites not under the control of the Government of Canada (GoC) are provided solely for the convenience of users. The GoC is not responsible for the accuracy, currency or the reliability of the content. The GoC does not offer any guarantee in that regard and is not responsible for the information found through these links, nor does it endorse the sites and their content.

Users should be aware that information offered by non-GoC sites that are not subject to the Official Languages Act and to which the Royal Canadian Mounted Police links, may be available only in the language(s) used by the sites in question.

Adult Sites Against Child Pornography (ASACP)
Adult Sites Against Child Pornography (ASCAP) was established in 1996 and among its members are over 4,700 adult websites. Since its development, ASACP has assisted the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the United States Customs Service by reviewing over 175,000 reports concerning websites that display child abuse images. When deemed appropriate, the reports are forwarded to the appropriate law enforcement agency. By working with the adult website industry, the ASACP is in a unique position to review reports quickly and efficiently, only passing along those that demonstrate a valid complaint, thus increasing the efficiency of the investigative process for law enforcement. Considering the ASACP is not affiliated with law enforcement, it has been suggested that concerned citizens are more likely to submit a report concerning child pornography to the ASACP as a result of them not being connected to any government agencies.

Head office location: Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Primary audiences: Adults and parents

Barnardo’s
Operating in the United Kingdom, Barnardo’s envisions a society in which children are free from poverty, discrimination, and abuse allowing them to fulfill their potential. In order to achieve these objectives, Barnardo’s strives to protect children from harm; to encourage emotional, physical, and mental health; to provide a sense of belonging in the community; and to provide opportunities to learn. Founded in 1866, Barnardo’s helps children overcome challenging experiences and disadvantage with the intent of allowing youth to develop into adults who will have a positive impact on society. Barnardo’s mission is to “give children back their future.”

Head office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, youth and parents

Captive Daughters
A non-profit organization established in 1997, Captive Daughters’ sole focus is to end the sexual bondage of women and children. Captive Daughters strives to bring public attention to the forced prostitution of girls and adolescent females with the intention of eliminating sex trafficking. In an effort to attract national and international attention to this issue, Captive Daughters provides information through their website including recommendations and reading lists, participates in various forums, and collaborates with other organizations.

Head office Location: Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, academics, parents, and youth

Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS)
Created in 1987, the Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS) located within the United States Department of Justice, is responsible for the prosecution of those who possess, manufacture, or distribute child pornography; those who buy, sell, or transport women or children across state or international borders for the purpose of engaging in explicit sexual conduct; and those who travel across state or international borders to abuse children. Attorneys working on behalf of CEOS also provide advice regarding prosecution policies, legislation, and government regulations relating to the sexual exploitation of minors. CEOS is also involved in training and policy development regarding child exploitation and the trafficking of women. The Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section clearly demonstrates the need for and the success achieved through partnerships and cooperation.

Head office location: Washington, DC, U.S.A.
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, and academics

Child Health Advocacy Network (CHANT)
Working under the National Children’s Bureau, the Child Health Advocacy Network (CHANT) promotes the mental, emotional, and physical health of all children while paying special attention to children in vulnerable positions and/or living in poverty. By working in partnership with professional associations and non-governmental organizations, the goals of CHANT are achieved through campaigning and lobbying, networking and joint initiatives, responding to consultation papers, and through seminars and conferences.

Head office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Politicians, children’s rights activists, parents and youth

Childline
Launched in 1986, Childline is a 24-hour helpline for children who are in danger and living in the United Kingdom. Over 1,000 volunteers, working under professional supervision, provide comfort and advice to children. Childline receives 4,000 calls daily regarding issues such as sexual and physical abuse, bullying, family tensions, pregnancy, and concerns about the welfare of friends. The Childline counselors use the information they receive to inform policy makers with the intent of improving conditions for children.

Head office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Politicians, law enforcement, children’s rights activists, parents, and youth

Childnet
Established in 1996, Childnet works with partners throughout the world to “help make the Internet a great and safe place for children.” Childnet’s vision is to ensure that policies and programs that promote the rights and protection of children on the Internet are recognized by those who develop, produce, control, use, and regulate the Internet and all other forms of communication. Although Childnet supports the freedom of expression, the organization feels that when it conflicts with the interests of children, the welfare of a child must be paramount.

Head office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Internet Service Providers, adults, parents, and youth

Children’s Charities Coalition for Internet Safety (CHIS)
Childline, National Children’s Home: Action for Children, Barnardo’s, the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, the National Children’s Bureau, the National Council for Voluntary Child Care Organizations, and the Children’s Society joined together in 2000 and formed The Children’s Charities Coalition on Internet Safety (CHIS). CHIS works in cooperation with government, industry, the media, law enforcement, and other agencies to promote the various safety issues regarding the use of the Internet by children.

Head office location: Unknown
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, politicians, academics, Internet Service Providers, parents, and adults  

Children’s Rights Information Network (CRIN)
With a membership of more than 1,400 organizations in over 130 countries, the Child Rights Information Network (CRIN) distributes information about the Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) to non-governmental organizations, various United Nations agencies, inter-governmental organizations, academic institutions, and other child rights experts. CRIN works to meet the demand of information created by individuals and organizations working to advance children’s rights; support and promote the implementation of the UNCRC; and support the work of other child rights organizations by training and developing electronic and non-electronic networking tools.

Head office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Children’s organizations, academics, adults, and youth

The Children’s Society
The goal of the Children’s Society is to create a world where each child is loved unconditionally, can be heard, and also understood. By looking through the eyes of children, the Children’s Society staff can imagine, explore, and identify the most efficient ways to meet the needs of the child. By focusing on the children who are most in need, the society intends to improve the criminal justice system by having the professionals working within the system view the victim as a child as opposed to a criminal. Professionals working in the field of protecting children from exploitation must understand that children who are sexually exploited, or involved in drugs, stealing, or begging are still children and are therefore in need of society’s protection.

Home office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, teachers, and youth

Combating Paedophile Information Networks in Europe (COPINE)
Housed in the Department of Applied Psychology at University College Cork in Cork, Ireland, the Combating Paedophile Information Networks in Europe (COPINE) project was founded in 1997. This academic initiative combines the fields of forensic and clinical psychology to analyze the vulnerabilities of children on the Internet. The COPINE project is interested primarily in the analysis of abusive images through forensic techniques; the nature of the offending process; the development, assessment, and therapeutic initiatives designed for Internet offenders; issues related to child victims; and finally, child sex tourism and trafficking. The COPINE project staff work in close partnership with law enforcement and other agencies working to prevent child exploitation.

Head office location: Cork, Ireland
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, academics, criminal justice professionals, adults, parents, teachers, and youth

The Council of Europe
Founded in 1949, the Council of Europe includes 45 countries and aims to defend human rights, develop continent-wide agreements to standardize the legal and social practices of member states, and also acts as a human rights watchdog for Europe’s post-communist countries. The organization continues to increase its monitoring capabilities to ensure that member states respect the commitments and obligations they were entrusted with when they joined the council. The United States, Japan, the Holy See, Mexico, and Canada have all been granted observer status.

Home office location: Strasbourg, France
Primary audiences: Children’s rights organizations

Crimes against ChildrenResearchCenter (CCRC)
Created in 1998 at the University of New Hampshire, the Crimes against Children Research Center (CCRC), directed by Dr. David Finkelhor, researches the various forms of victimization inflicted on youth and adolescents including assaults, different types of abuse, child to child violence, and indirect victimization where children are involved as a witness. The goals of the CCRC are to achieve a greater understanding of the extent to which children who are in contact with the criminal justice system are victimized. The CCRC will accomplish this through improved record keeping, history taking, and information exchanging; by protecting the child from further victimization and unnecessary trauma associated with the procedures of the criminal justice system; and aiding in the treatment and rehabilitation of children through programs and various services.

Head office location: Durham, New Hampshire, U.S.A.
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, academics, and parents

CyberAngels
Established in 1995, CyberAngels, a division of Guardian Angels, is operated entirely by volunteers and acts as a “virtual 411” for Internet safety regarding online abuse and cybercrime by providing preventive strategies and advice for parents and children. By offering prevention programs, assistance in tracking and identifying offenders, and monitoring the current issues surrounding Internet use and cybercrime, CyberAngels has been a leader in this field since its development. Under the leadership of Curtis Sliwa, the CyberAngels volunteer network includes law enforcement officers, information technology experts, academics, parents, librarians, and professionals from the legal field. In 1998 CyberAngels was the recipient of the prestigious President’s Service Award.

Home office location: Allentown, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. (Guardian Angels)
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, criminal justice professionals, academics, parents, youth, and teachers

The Cyber Law Enforcement Organization (CLEO)
The Cyber Law Enforcement Organization (CLEO), a division of wiredsafety.org, led by Parry Aftab, is composed of officers who specialize in the investigation of cybercrime and provide online assistance to the victims of cybercrime. Through the operation of a tipline, CLEO investigates cases of child pornography, cyberstalking, missing children, and online fraud. Their goals include uniting police officers worldwide, providing investigative assistance to various agencies, providing online assistance and education, and finally, relationship building between law enforcement, Internet Service Providers, the legal system, and victim’s groups throughout the world.

Head office location: Trenton, Ontario, Canada
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, criminal justice professionals, victim’s rights organizations, parents, youth, and teachers

Cyberspace Research Unit: University of Central Lancashire
Established in January 2000 by Rachel O’Connell, the Cyberspace Research Unit empowers children with the appropriate skills, knowledge, and necessary tools that are required to use the Internet safely. The unit explores how criminals use the Internet, offers suggestions on ways to develop efficient investigative strategies, and also fulfills the roles of researcher, policy advisor, educator, and media spokesperson.

Head office location: Lanchashire, United Kingdom
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, criminal justice professionals, academics, adults, parents, teachers, and youth

Cybertip.ca
Cybertip.ca, established by Child Find Manitoba, operates a website that receives and addresses reports from the public regarding the online sexual exploitation of children. Receiving 555 reports in its first year of operation (2002-2003), Cybertip.ca functions as a clearinghouse by analyzing reports and forwarding valid complaints to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

Within Canada, Cybertip.ca has developed working relationships with the Winnipeg Police Department, the Toronto Police Department’s Child Exploitation Unit, the Ontario Provincial Police’s “Project P”, Halifax’s Project Horizon, the Surete du Quebec, and many others. Internationally, Cybertip.ca has formed partnerships with the National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children, the Internet Watch Foundation, and the Save the Children Hotline. By gathering statistics, Cybertip.ca seeks to identify the profile of children most likely to be victimized online, promote the identification of victims, develop best practices, and increase public awareness and education through the development of various resources to promote online safety.

Cybertip.ca is also supported by and works with the Winnipeg Police Service, the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and the National Child Exploitation Coordination Centre (NCECC).

Head office location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, adults, teachers, parents, and youth

Dot.safe
In response to the various challenges presented by the Internet, Dot.safe, a pilot project involving 23 European States, attempts to supply educators and parents with appropriate information and resources with the intention of promoting the safety of children on the Internet. The four principle objectives of the project are to raise awareness concerning what is available and what is effective; to develop new materials and technical solutions; to test and evaluate those materials; and to continue to develop plans and disseminate information.

Head office location: Unknown
Primary audiences: Parents, youth, and teachers

End Child Prostitution, Child Pornography, and Trafficking of Children for Sexual Purposes (ECPAT)
The organization fighting to End Child Prostitution, Child Pornography, and Trafficking of Children for Sexual Purposes (ECPAT) is dedicated to preventing child pornography on the Internet as well as the online solicitation of minors. By building relationships with Internet Service Providers and software and search engine producers, ECPAT attempts to solve the problem of child pornography being distributed through the Internet. ECPAT participates in policy discussions, creates and staffs hotlines, develops and encourages codes of conduct, and promotes the safe use of the Internet. Essentially, ECPAT is interested in identifying the extent of Internet-based child pornography and developing international solutions to solve this global problem.

Head office location: Bangkok
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, Internet Service Providers, adults, parents, and youth

Federal Bureau of Investigation: Innocent Images National Initiative (IINI)
Working within the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Cyber Crimes Program, the Innocent Images National Initiative (IINI) has a mission to identify, investigate, and prosecute sexual offenders who use the Internet to sexually exploit children; to develop a presence of law enforcement officers on the Internet with the intent of creating a deterrent effect; and finally, to identify and rescue children being exploited. Currently, the focus of the IINI has shifted to include identifying the major producers and distributors of child pornography as well as those who are willing to travel internationally for the purpose of engaging in sexual activity with a minor (traveler cases and sex tourism). The final objective of the Innocent Images National Initiative is to identify child victims and arrange proper treatment thus allowing them to effectively deal with the trauma and abuse that they have endured.

Head office location: Washington, DC, U.S.A.
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, and academics

Innocence in Danger (IID)
Innocence in Danger is an international non-profit association created in 1999. Operating in 28 countries, Innocence in Danger is composed of Internet specialists, jurists, politicians, business professionals, and others. The aim of this organization is to alert the international community regarding the increasing problem of “paedo-criminality”. Their mission is to provide moral, juridical, and financial support to child victims; to track criminals abusing children through the Internet; to support doctors and other professionals who risk their careers and personal safety to assist abused children; and finally, to alert the media concerning the seriousness and frequency of this offence. Innocence in Danger strives to design online courses, organize national and international workshops, and develop an international database of children who have been trafficked, abused, or are currently missing.

Head office location: Paris, France
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, criminal justice professionals, community professionals, parents and youth

International Hotlines for Europe (INHOPE)
The primary goal of the International Hotlines for Europe (INHOPE) association is to enhance the cooperation among Internet hotline providers to eliminate child pornography from the Internet in addition to protecting children from illegal activities associated with Internet use. INHOPE achieves this objective by exchanging expertise and reports, educating and informing policy makers, supporting new hotlines, and establishing strong relationships and links with various hotlines outside of Europe. INHOPE trains and supports new hotlines, strives to increase awareness and education of Internet safety throughout Europe, and has established a common and effective procedure for receiving and responding to complaints.

Head office location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, adults, parents, teachers, and youth

International Save the Children Alliance
Save the Children fights for children’s rights to ensure that each child is valued and respected, has the opportunity to learn and be heard, and has hope and opportunity. The 27 Save the Children organizations operating throughout the world form the International Save the Children Alliance which is one the world’s largest independent movements striving to improve the lives of children. Improvements are achieved by lobbying governments and the international community to identify areas where policy and practice do not result in the full protection of children. With regard to child exploitation and abuse, Save the Children employs various strategies to combat these problems such as working with children to identify the causes of exploitation and the development of realistic prevention methods.

Home office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Government agencies, criminal justice professionals, academics, and youth

International Society for Policing of Cyberspace (POLCYB)
The International Society for Policing of Cyberspace (POLCYB), a not-for-profit society located in British Columbia, Canada seeks to enhance international partnerships among professionals in the public and private sectors (including law enforcement, the criminal justice system, corporate security, and academia) to prevent and combat crimes in cyberspace. POLCYB aims to develop a network for the sharing of knowledge, information, and resources to prevent online crimes; to facilitate international forums to inform and educate the public about the efforts currently being undertaken by professionals working in the field; and finally, to provide information to the public regarding the prevention of online victimization and the promotion of Internet safety.

Head office location: Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, academics, adults, parents, and youth

Internet Watch Foundation (IWF)
The Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) hotline attempts to minimize the amount of illegal Internet content, placing strong emphasis on child abuse images, currently available on the Internet, by working in partnership with Internet Service Providers, mobile operators, software providers, law enforcement, and government. The hotline provides Internet users with a mechanism to report illegal content, and is the United Kingdom’s equivalent to the NCMEC cyber tipline in the United States or Canada’s cybertip.ca.

Head office location: Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, adults, parents, and youth

Kids.ap
Kids.ap, a non-profit organization, is focused on assisting in the eradication of child pornography and sexual abusers on the Internet. Registered in Australia, Kids.ap is the Asia/Pacific chapter of the Innocence In Danger Foundation. The vision of Kids.ap is a society in which the sexual exploitation of children through the Internet and other digital means is non-existent. Kids.ap works to attain this vision by operating a website devoted to the dissemination of educational and technical information that highlights the issue of online child sexual exploitation.

Head Office Location: Australia
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, criminal justice professionals, adults, parents, and youth

Lucy Faithful Foundation
The Lucy Faithful Foundation is an independent child protection agency working in the United Kingdom. The foundation conducts assessments on men and women who have been convicted or who are suspected of sexually abusing children. In addition, the foundation offers treatment programs designed to manage and reduce the risk of re-offending. The foundation also operates a residential facility designed for the long-term treatment of sex abusers. To accomplish their goal of ensuring and protecting the welfare of children, the Lucy Faithful Foundation works with the parents of children who have been sexually abused by providing treatment, advice, and also by assessing the ability of the parents to protect their child in the future. Throughout the process of achieving their objective, the foundation attempts to minimize the re-victimization of the child and his/her family.

Head office location: United Kingdom
Primary audiences: Sexual offenders, criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, academics, parents, and youth

Media Awareness Network (MNET)
The Media Awareness Network (MNET) is a non-profit organization that was established in 1996 and has offices in Ottawa and Montreal. Through their work with various Canadian and international organizations, the creation of online resources and programs, and by speaking to audiences around the world, MNET promotes media and Internet awareness. MNET hosts an award winning website containing in excess of 300 lesson plans for educators, resources for librarians and teachers, information and tools for parents, and a database of articles, reports, and other reference materials. MNET is funded by the Government of Canada and various organizations operating within the private sector.

Head office location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Primary Audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, teachers, parents, and youth

Movement Against Paedophilia on the Internet (MAPI)
The Movement against Paedophilia on the Internet (MAPI) is a voluntary organization composed of researchers and professors from the University of Namur in Belgium. The four principle goals of MAPI are to study the problem of paedophile networks on the Internet that encourage the sexual exploitation of children; inform Internet users regarding the gravity of this problem; perform legal, technical, and ethical research on exiting solutions; and finally, to develop recommendations for lawyers and politicians in addition to those who provide paedophiles with access and sites for web pages and newsgroups.

Head office location: Belgium
Primary audiences: Academics, politicians, criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, adults, parents, and youth

NationalCenter for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC)
The National Centre for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) was established in 1984 as a private, non-profit organization to provide services for families and professionals to prevent the abduction, endangerment, and sexual exploitation of children. The NCMEC acts as a clearinghouse for information on missing and/or exploited children; operates a tipline; provides technical assistance for the prevention, investigation, and prosecution of cases; offers training programs; coordinates child protection efforts with professionals in the private sector; and networks with other non-profit service providers.

Head office location: Alexandria, Virginia, U.S.A.
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, adults, parents, and youth

NationalCenter for Prosecution of Child Abuse (NCPCA)
Developed in 1985 by the National District Attorneys Association, the National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse (NCPCA) acts as a central resource for training, court reform, expert legal assistance, and offers information on child abuse investigations and prosecutions. To accomplish their goal of improving the handling of child abuse cases, the NCPCA also acts as a clearinghouse offering case law, court reforms, and trial strategies; publishes manuals, newsletters, statutory summaries, and investigation and prosecution handbooks; and conducts research with academics, prosecutors, and a variety of other specialists to develop best practices to combat child abuse.

Head office location: Alexandria, Virginia, U.S.A.
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, academics, and parents

National Children’s Bureau (NCB)
The National Children’s Bureau (NCB), established in 1963, is an internationally recognized authority on policy, research, and best practices relating to children in England and Northern Ireland. Through research, project development, and evaluation, the NCB attempts to influence policy and engage in knowledge sharing. The National Children’s Bureau accomplishes these goals by challenging disadvantage in childhood, working with children to ensure they are involved in all matters that affect their lives, promoting multi-disciplinary partnerships, and disseminating the information received through research with the various organizations working with young people.

Head office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Adults, parents, and youth

National Children’s Home: Action for Children (NCH)
With offices in England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, the National Children’s Home (NCH) has been assisting children and young people facing difficulties or challenges in their lives since 1869. The NCH views itself as the United Kingdom’s largest provider of services to disabled children and their families, family and community centers, and services for young people living in care.

Head office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Parents and youth

National Council for Voluntary Child Care Organizations (NCVCCO)
Established in 1942, the National Council for Voluntary Child Care Organizations (NCVCCO) acts as an umbrella organization for registered charities (now numbering over 100) who aim to improve the quality of life for children. By maximizing the contribution from the voluntary sector, the NCVCCO strives to ensure the well-being and safety of children. The organization’s strategic goals include informing and influencing policy, promoting the values and principles of the voluntary child care sector, and finally, addressing practice and training issues to increase the benefits offered by the different organizations working with children.

Head office location: London, England
Primary audiences: Adults and parents

National Crime Squad
Established in 1998, the United Kingdom’s National Crime Squad operates to combat national and international serious and organized crime. They achieve this objective by supporting and developing partnerships with other law enforcement agencies attempting to combat similar crimes. The National Crime Squad is dedicated to achieving these ends through the principles of honesty, integrity, transparency, and fairness.

Head office location: United Kingdom
Primary audiences: Law enforcement and criminal justice professionals

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC)
The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC), whose mission is to end cruelty toward children, is a leading charity in the United Kingdom. The NSPCC envisions a society that refuses to tolerate the sexual, physical, and emotional abuse of children. Working on behalf of children since 1884, the NSPCC operates 180 community-based teams and projects in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. They provide a child protection hotline; public education campaigns; child protection training; fundraising initiatives; and advice, research, and information resources. The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children is unique in that it is a children’s charity that possesses statutory powers thus allowing it to act in the best interests of children who are at risk of being abused.

Head office location: United Kingdom
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, criminal justice professionals, parents and youth

Our Missing Children
Our Missing Children was established in 1993. It is comprised of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Citizenship and Immigration’s Missing Children’s Registry, the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, and Canada Customs’ International Project Return. The mission of Our Missing Children is to search for missing Canadian children and return them to a safe environment. It’s mandate includes preventing the illegal movement of children across international borders; gathering information and developing statistics; acting as a coordination centre for national and international investigations; developing training, prevention, and educational programs; and most importantly, assisting in the recovery of Canadian children. The goals of the program are accomplished through the use of computer age progression technology, a travel/reunification program (designed to assist those lacking the financial means to return their child to the home), the Canada Customs International Project Return (which alerts customs officers regarding children who could be identified at an international border crossing), and finally, workshops for police officers. Our Missing Children has developed strong partnerships with Canadian Child Find Organizations, the Missing Children’s Network, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and other national and international agencies.

Head office location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Target Audiences: Law enforcement, parents, adults, teachers, and youth

RespectED: Violence and Abuse Prevention
Operating since 1984, this Red Cross program works to promote healthier relationships and safer communities by helping adults and youth understand abuse, harassment, and interpersonal violence. It is the belief of the Red Cross that the cycle of abuse can only end through education. The section of the Red Cross website devoted to RespectED provides statistics highlighting the percentage of youth in Canada who face various forms of abuse each day.

Head office location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Red Cross)
Primary audiences: Law enforcement, parents, youth, and teachers

The Safe OnLine Outreach Society (SOLOS)
The Safe Online Outreach Society (SOLOS) is a non-profit organization located in Mission, British Columbia, Canada established in response to the issue of online child sexual exploitation. SOLOS creates material to educate parents, youth, teachers, and professionals in contact with youth regarding the dangers currently faced on the Internet. SOLOS trains law enforcement, teachers, social workers, and crisis response workers to identify and respond appropriately to the online sexual exploitation of youth.

Head office location: Mission, British Columbia, Canada
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, teachers, parents, and youth

Virtual Global Task Force
The Virtual Global Task Force is a collaboration of police including Britain, Australia, Canada, and the United States who coordinate joint patrols of chat rooms in order to search for predators. They do not work in an undercover capacity but rather as officers patrolling cyberspace as an initiative designed to alert the public of the police presence on the Internet. The intent of these “cyberpatrols” is to protect children by deterring sexual abusers and child abuse image collectors from using the Internet as a tool in the commission of an offence.

Head office location: Unknown
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals and law enforcement

Wired Safety
Led by Parry Aftab, WiredSafety has more than 9,000 volunteers working throughout the world and offers one of the largest online safety and education initiatives available. WiredSafety works to provide education regarding cybercrime; provides help for online victims of cybercrime and harassment; assists law enforcement agencies throughout the world to prevent and investigate cybercrime; and provides information regarding online safety, privacy, and security. WiredSafety also places emphasis on offering support and training to law enforcement, creating awareness and cybercrime prevention programs, and offering expertise to government groups and other agencies requiring their assistance. WiredSafety also acts as an umbrella organization overseeing two other initiatives to increase online safety and awareness: Wiredkids.org and WiredCops.org.

Head office location: Unknown
Primary audiences: Criminal justice professionals, law enforcement, parents, youth, and teachers